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Mark Lane Said that Clay Shaw Was a "Powerful, Domestic Force in the Assassination."

Updated: Jul 11

Here is an article from the Biloxi Daily Herald from April 29, 1967:

The article says that "In accordance with the Louisiana Bar's wishes, Lane was forced not to comment on the current Garrison investigation," while at the hotel, but he had no problem telling the Biloxi Daily Herald that "David Ferrie, Clay Shaw, and Oswald were together at meetings in New Orleans to plan the assassination."


He is just plain wrong about David Ferrie - he was not found with a sheet over his head.


In 1992 Mark Lane wrote a new introduction to Rush to Judgment in which he wrote:

"I never saw credible evidence which convinced me that he [Clay Shaw] had ever used the alias. [of Bertrand]"

Mark Lane also wrote this:

"In the film David Ferrie is questioned by Jim Garrison. Garrison is suspicious, but Ferrie denies any complicity in the murder. In the film Ferrie has a second meeting with Garrison at which members of his staff are also present. In an unforgettable scene, which becomes the linchpin of the film and establishes Shaw's guilt, the actor portraying Ferrie has a nervous breakdown before the eyes of the audience, confesses his own guilt and implicates Shaw in the murder as well. If you are not as yet convinced, Stone, in a rather heavy-handed scene, resorts to a flashback in which we actually see Shaw and Ferrie plotting the crime. It is impressive. It is conclusive. It is a fabrication."

Why was Lane so certain in 1967 that Shaw was guilty?



Previous Relevant Posts on Mark Lane


Mark Lane Offers to Introduce Jim Garrison to "Mr. Candy"


Reverend Raymond Broshears Tells All to Stephen Jaffe and Mark Lane


"I Know Who Killed JFK," Part Two


Did RFK Tell Garrison that there were guns between him and the White House?


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